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Farmers Test New Corn Seeds In Hopes To Battle The Drought of 2012

August 21, 2012

 by Machinefinder

John Deere Corn Head

Companies like John Deere have relied upon innovation and the incorporation of the latest technology to stay ahead of the curve, but this devotion to progress doesn’t just help the firm bring in revenue. The products they offer allow farmers to withstand any changes to the agricultural sector or to the weather patterns that can drastically affect yields and harvests each year.

Given the state of the industry in the U.S., reeling after widespread drought and persistent heat, all of these technological advances are necessary for farmers to keep their head above ground. John Deere products continue to benefit the sector, and people that rely on the company for newer versions of harvesters, tractors and mowers have yet to be disappointed.

Each year, the company rolls out its latest line of one type of farm implement, or sometimes multiple versions, and farmers are often quick to scoop up these innovative models. This, combined with the growing role of science within the industry has made the sector one of the most sustainable parts of the economy.

According to The Associated Press, the farmers and crop scientists that feed the population have noted that it may be too late to fight any changes to the climate, necessitating them to adapt to any changes that may occur through the use of innovative new technology.

Plants need to be engineered to survive, and animals need to be given food that will allow them to sustain a drier climate.

“The single-largest limitation for agriculture worldwide is drought,” said Andrew Wood, a professor of plant physiology and molecular biology at Southern Illinois University.

According to the news outlet, some farmers are testing new types of crops that require less water and are able to sustain high levels of heat.

One Kansas farmer, Clay Scott, is testing a new type of corn called Droughtguard, as he is looking to adjust his crop holdings to fight the drought that is currently wreaking havoc on farms across the midwest.

“These are products I really need,” Scott told the AP, noting a lack of water has hurt many of the operations in the area. “I couldn’t be any happier that they are working on these products.”

While farmers continue to adjust to the new conditions provided by the weather, companies like John Deere stand right behind these individuals.

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